Category Archives: Miscellaneous

Disaster Preparepdness

 

With recent storms and power outages, disaster preparedness has made front page news.  Many of us have the intention of making plans for our homes and loved ones, but we didn’t.  There is no time like the present to set up your plan and gather supplies.

* Proper Identification:  in the event of a natural disaster, or even a house fire, a collar showing clear, up-to-date ID is crucial.  It is strongly encouraged that all pets have a microchip implanted as means of permanent identification, ensuring that the information corresponding to the microchip is updated as well.  Keep a copy of your pet’s current medical record/vaccine history in a safe place, along with a current photo.

*Supplies: a well stocked bin of pet supplies is essential!  Stock enough food and drinking water for no less than 3 days, but it doesn’t hurt to have more on hand.  Also include a copy of your pet’s medical records/vaccination history (in a water safe bag), along with a photo, leash and collar, litter, medication, litter trays, etc.

*Carriers and Crates:  a carrier or crate can temporarily house pets at vet clinics or even hotels that would not normally take pets.  Cat carriers should be large enough to hold a cat and their littler box.

Get more information on disaster preparedness at www.ready.gov/america/getakit/pets.html

[courtesy: Fetch]

The 10 Canine Commandments

 

 

 

1. My life is likely to last 10 to 15 years, maybe longer.  Any separation from you will be painful to me.  Remember that before you buy or adopt me.

2.  Give me time to understand what you want from me.

3.  Place your trust in me.  It’s crucial to my well being.

4.  Don’t be angry with me for long, and don’t lock me up as punishment.  You have your work, your entertainment and your friends.  I only have you.

5.  Talk to me sometimes.  Even if I don’t understand your words, I understand your voice when it’s speaking to me.

6.  Be aware that however you treat me, I’ll never forget it.

7.  Remember before you hit me:  I have teeth that could easily crush the bones of your hand, but I choose not to bite you.

8.  Before you scold me fore being uncooperative, obstinate or lazy, ask yourself if something might be bothering me.  Perhaps I’m not getting the right food, or I’ve been out in the sun to long, or my  heart is getting old and weak.

9.  Take care of me when I get old.  You too will grow old.

10.  Go with me on difficult journeys.  Never say: “I can’t bear to watch it” or “let it happen in my absence”.  Everything is easier if you are there.

 

REMEMBER THAT I LOVE YOU.

Comparative Cost Analysis: DENTALS

Dental disease is the #1 most-diagnosed problem, with nearly 70% of dogs and cats having some form of dental disease by two years of age.

So why isn’t more done about dental disease in our pets?  Are we as owners unaware of this problem?  Does cost turn us off to having a dental procedure performed on our pet?

 

We see dental disease, in various stages, everyday in our practices.  The dog pictured above is suffering from severe dental disease and will go through an  intense dental procedure in order to remove the plaque and tartar build-up, in addition to a few extractions of diseased teeth.

How can this be avoided?  

Regular brushing at home is a great place to start! We carry a pet-friendly toothbrush and toothpaste kit at both clinics.  Dental items can also be purchased from your local pet store.  In addition to brushing, incorporating a mouth rinse, water additive, or dental chew is another great method of promoting good dental health.

I didn’t know my pet had bad teeth, and now he needs a dental cleaning!  What sort of costs should I expect?

Depending on the severity of the dental disease diagnosed by our doctors, dental cleaning can range from a routine cleaning up to a severe dental with several extractions.  Let’s break it down a little bit more:

 

Dentist

NSAC/UAVH

 Cleaning & Polishing

$50 – $120

$150.00

Blood Work

Not Generally Offered

$60.00

IV Catheter & Fluids

Not Generally Offered

$38.50

Extraction/Oral Surgery

$290.00 per tooth

$120.00 per 30 min.

Anesthesia

$455.00 per 30 min.

$60.00 per 30 min.

Doctor’s Fee

$146.00

$20.00

(These prices reflect a local average offered by various dentists in the Greater Columbus Area. )

Why is a dental for my pet so expensive?

The initial sticker shock of a dental procedure for your pet can be a bit overwhelming at first.  But, if you take a minute to break down the cost, you will see that it’s really not as expensive as you might think.

Think about the last time you went to the dentist for more than a cleaning.  If your dentist were to charge for an extraction in the same method we do, here is the potential cost you could be looking at:  $891!  (And that’s just including the doctor’s fee, anesthesia and extraction!)   We take an extra few steps to ensure your pet’s safety, by checking blood levels prior to anesthesia, placing an IV catheter and running fluids to maintain blood pressure.

What if you needed a crown or a root canal?  Speaking from experience, those can run you about $2,400!  So a full dental cleaning for your dog, under general anesthesia, with several extractions is just a fraction of the cost for the repair of one human tooth!

The biggest difference between human dental procedures and those performed by a veterinarian:  HUMANS HAVE INSURANCE TO HELP DEFRAY COST! (Most humans, that is!)

Your dog could look this good after a dental cleaning.

Call us today to schedule an appointment to see if YOUR pet needs a dental cleaning.  Prevention is key!

 

A Tribute to the Dog

A TRIBUTE TO THE DOG
A speech by Missouri Senator George Graham Vest?
Year: 1870
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Gentlemen of the Jury

The best friend a man has in the world may turn against him and become his enemy.  His son or daughter that he has reared with loving care may prove ungrateful.  Those who are nearest and dearest to us, those whom we trust with our happiness and our good name may become traitors to their faith.  The money that a man has, he may lose.  It flies away from him, perhaps when he needs it most.  A man’s reputation may be sacrificed in a moment of ill-considered action.  The people who are prone to fall on their knees to do us honor when success is with us may be the first to throw the stone of malice when failure settles its cloud upon our heads.

The one absolutely unselfish friend that man can have in this selfish world, the one that never deserts him, the one that never proves ungrateful or treacherous is his dog.  A man’s dog stands by him in prosperity and in poverty, in health and in sickness.  He will sleep on the cold ground, where the wintry winds blow and the snow drives fiercely, if only he may be near his master’s side.  He will kiss the hand that has no food to offer; he will lick the wounds and sores that conm in an encounter with the roughness of the world.  He guards the sleep of his pauper master as if he were a prince.  When all other friends desert, he remains.  When riches take wings, and reputation falls to pieces, he is as constant in love as the sun in its journey through the heavens.

If fortune drives the master forth an outcast in the world, friendless and homeless, the faithful dog asks no higher privilege than that of accompanying him, to guard him against danger, to fight against his enemies.  And when the last scene of all comes, and death takes his master in its embrace and his body is laid away in the cold ground, no matter if all other friends pursue their way, there by the graveside will the noble dog be found, his head between his paws, his eyes sad, but open in alert watchfulness, faithful and true even in death.